Rhythmic Curves for a Santa Monica Residence

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An article came in my inbox from Interior Design Homes showcasing two modern architects - John Friedman and Alice Kimm.  Both are modern architects that were tired of boxy, stacked architecture.  The married co-principals of multicultural heritages - North African and South American - commissioned a new home in Santa Monica, California and blamed it on BOSSA NOVA.  This home is an excellent example of Contemporary Design.

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Apart from an aquarium-like window and a glazed upper corner, the wood-and-plaster house presents a closed face to the street since the clients wanted limited fenestration and no conventional entry on that public frontage. Photography by Benny Chan/Fotoworks.

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In the double-height living room at the front of the house, a teak-topped wall-mounted cabinet and freeform acrylic coffee table, both custom, are joined by a Charles and Ray Eames iconic rocker and an Isamu Noguchi floor lamp. Photography by Benny Chan/Fotoworks.

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The stair has a recessed handrail of stainless steel. Photography by Benny Chan/Fotoworks.

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Several carefully positioned skylights throw dramatic shafts of sunshine on the living room walls. Photography by Benny Chan/Fotoworks.

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In the master bath, terrazzo tile flooring and custom lacquered MDF cabinetry join walls tiled in a wave pattern based on mosaic paving at Copacabana Beach. Photography by Benny Chan/Fotoworks.

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A pergola of gently undulating powder-coated aluminum slats provides shelter from the sun on the concrete back terrace. Photography by Benny Chan/Fotoworks.

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An Anders Nørgaard sectional sofa, a custom acrylic and stainless-steel coffee table, and a Moroccan-style rug gather under Clara von Zweigbergk’s pendant fixture in the family den area. Photography by Benny Chan/Fotoworks.

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A custom table of granite and teak—the same wood as the base of the neighboring solid-surfacing topped island—and Karim Rashid’s Oh chair furnish the open kitchen area. Photography by Benny Chan/Fotoworks.

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The exuberant rear portion of the house is as open and curvilinear as its more sober front facade is closed and rectilinear. Photography by Benny Chan/Fotoworks.

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In an oblique nod to Brazil’s national sport, the hexagonal cement-tile pattern in a child’s sky-lit bathroom suggests soccer balls. Photography by Benny Chan/Fotoworks.